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Rape Drugs Are Very Easily Acquired but Morbidly dangerous

Club Drugs (Can Kill You)

The popular use of “Club Drugs” by teen and young adult dance-club-goers to feel good fast and to enhance the effect of alcohol has brought a wide distribution of street product also known as “Rape Drugs”. Club Drugs are popular at dance clubs, concerts, and “raves.”

People acquiring these products are virtually untraceable because the product is so common and the distribution is so widespread.

Speed, Acid, Ecstasy (MDMA), GHB, Rohypnol (“roofies”) and ketamine are common “Club Drugs”. These drugs are not all classified in the same category, but they share some similar effects and dangers.

Club drugs are typically of the psychoactive group of chemicals meaning that they act on the central nervous system and can cause changes in mood, awareness, and behaviour. These drugs are commonly abused by young adults at all-night dance parties, dance clubs, and bars. Some of these drugs are approved for certain medical uses. Any other use of these drugs is abuse.

Symptoms and Signs of ‘club drug’ use and dependence can include:

  • Depending on how the drugs are taken, the effects may be felt immediately (through injecting or smoking) or within 30 minutes (if snorted or swallowed).
* A Heightened Or Altered Sense Of Sight, Sound And Taste
* A Sense Of Power And Superiority Over Others
* Abrupt Shifts In Thought And Speech That Can Make People Difficult To Understand
* Amphetamine-Like Effects (With Speed, Ketamine And Ecstasy)
* An Artificial Sense Of Euphoria Or Certainty
* Chest Pain
* Decreased Coordination
* Delusions
* Distortion Of One’S Sense Of Time And Identity
* Dizziness
* Drowsiness and loss of consciousness (with GHB and Rohypnol)
* Dry Mouth
* Enlarged Pupils
* Faster Reaction Times
* Fear Of Losing Control
* Feeling More Awake And Alert, Reduced Need For Sleep & Difficulty Sleeping
* Feeling More Energetic
* Feelings Of Euphoria, Excitement And A Sense Of Well Being
* Feelings Of Increased Strength
* Flashbacks, (LSD) Long After Taking Drug
* Hallucinations
* Headaches
* Impaired Depth Perception
* Impaired Time Perception, Distorted Perception Of The Size & Shape Of
Objects, Movements, Color, Sounds, Touch & The User’S Own Body Image
* Raised Body Temp
* Incr. Breathing Rate
* Increased Confidence
* Increased Libido
* Increased Sweating
* Increased Talkativeness
* Heart Palpitations
* Irritability, Hostility And Aggression
* Itching, Picking And Scratching.
* Memory Problems Or Loss Of Memory
* Nervousness, Anxiety, Agitation And Panic, Panic Attacks
* Paranoia
* Poor Judgment
* Reduced Appetite
* Reduced Inhibitions
* Repetition Of Simple Acts
* Severe Depression Or Psychosis
* Stomach Cramps, Stomach Irritation (If Swallowed)

Rape Drugs

Popular trends and a whole night-life culture around “Club Drugs” means anyone can get ‘rape drugs’.

Rape drugs are typically colorless, odorless, and tasteless drugs given often unknowingly to the victim allowing a sexual assault or rape to occur and rendering the victim amnestic to the event & amnestic to the identity of the perpertrator(s). These drugs typically reduce sexual inhibitions and exert potent sedation. The victim remembers nothing. 

Five common rape drugs are:

  • Rohypnol (roh-HIP-nol). Rohypnol is the trade name for flunitrazepam (FLOO-neye-TRAZ-uh-pam).  Rohypnol is also known as: Circles, Forget Pill, LA Rochas, Lunch Money, Mexican Valium, Mind Erasers, Poor Man’s Quaalude, R-2, Rib, Roach, Roach-2, Roches, Roofies, Roopies, Rope, Rophies, Ruffies, Trip-and-Fall, and Whiteys. As a prescription medication, Rohypnol is used as a preanesthetic medication and as a short term treatment for insomnia. It may be used to treat the depression resulting from use of cocainemethamphetamine, and other stimulants.   Overdose of Rohypnol produces sedation, impaired speech and balance, respiratory depression, and potentially coma or death. The drug has been used in connection with rape and robbery to incapacitate the victim and prevent him or her from recalling the crime. Rohypnol may be used to commit suicide. It is illegal to manufacture, sell, or use Rohypnol in the United States.
  • Two drugs similar to Rohypnol have replaced Rohypnol abuse in some parts of the United States. These are: clonazepam (marketed as Klonopin in the U.S. and Rivotril in Mexico) and alprazolam (marketed as Xanax) short-acting anxiolytic of the benzodiazepine class.  These are  benzodiazepine drugs having anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, muscle relaxant, sedative, and hypnotic properties. They are powerful even in small doses.
  • GHB, which is short for gamma hydroxybutyric (GAM-muh heye-DROX-ee-BYOO-tur-ihk) acid. GHB is also known as: Bedtime Scoop, Cherry Meth, Easy Lay, Energy Drink, G, G-Juice, Gamma 10, Georgia Home Boy, Gook, Goop, Great Hormones, Grievous Bodily Harm (GBH), Liquid E, Liquid Ecstasy, Liquid X, PM, Salt Water, Soap, Somatomax, Vand ita-G.
    The effects of GHB can be unpredictable and may vary from person to person or from occasion to occasion. The effects are typically felt within 10 to 20 minutes following ingestion and may last for up to five hours. GHB may make people feel relaxed, euphoric, or sleepy. It can cause people to lose their inhibitions. GHB can trigger nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Users may also vomit during sleep and choke.
    GHB can make people feel dizzy for several days after using GHB. Short-term use of GHB can produce many other effects including: loss of coordination (stumbling, jerky movements), memory loss, loss of consciousness, slowed breathing, decreased blood pressure and heart rate, and lowered body temperature.
    Taking GHB with other central nervous system depressants (like alcohol or benzodiazepines) is extremely dangerous, like Russian roulette with five bullets in the cylinder. When used together, the depressive effects of these drugs on the central nervous system are greater than when each drug is used alone. This intense depression of the central nervous system can lead to respiratory arrest and ultimately death.
  • Ketamine (KEET-uh-meen), also known as: Black Hole, Bump, Cat Valium, Green, Jet, K, K-Hole, Kit Kat, Psychedelic Heroin, Purple, Special Acid, and Acid. <
    Ketamine is an excellent anesthetic for seriously injured patients, for example in a war. Ketamine is a complicated hallucinogen but also combines features associated with stimulants and depressants. It can have some extremely harsh and long term side effects which may be ignored when Ketamine is used as a rapid-acting anesthetic drug by veterinarians on animals and occasionally in high-trauma field surgery on humans.
    Ketamine is also known as a “dissociative anesthetic” because it can make a person feel a sense of detachment, as if their mind is separated from their body which is a useful effect in an anaesthetic used for severe physical and emotional trauma cases.
    Commercial ketamine comes in the form of a liquid while the street drug is usually sold as a powder. When it is abused, the powder is typically dissolved in a liquid, snorted, or smoked in a cigarette. Liquid ketamine is sometimes injected into a muscle. Injecting it in a vein can cause rapid loss of consciousness. The immediate effect of this drug can be  sleepiness, confusion, loss of coordination, blurred vision, inability to speak, nausea and vomiting, fever, increased blood pressure and heart rate, memory loss, nose bleeds, unpleasant taste, decreased response to pain.
    Also, a person might experience: temporary paralysis (inability to move), incoherence or semi-consciousness, respiratory depression (slowed breathing), severe rise in blood pressure.

A person who deliberately poisons you with drugs like these is risking your (likely under some circumstances) death and certainly causing you harmful short and long-term effect from the drug(s). Moreover, apart from the drug effects, their intentions for you are also likely of a serious criminal nature. They ONLY INTEND TO HARM YOU.

GHB and Rohypnol are particularly dangerous. At high doses, they can cause immediate seizures, coma and death.

The danger increases when these drugs are taken with alcohol.

Because they worsen consciousness and memory and they’re easy to give someone without his or her knowledge or consent, these drugs are commonly used as rape drugs.

“Date rape drug” is inaccurately used to describe all drugs used for “drug-facilitated sexual assault or rape.”  The term “date rape” is misleading because the person who commits the crime is often an acquaintance or stranger and not a “date”.

Rape drugs.

These drugs are also used to help men & women commit other serious crimes, like robbery, murder and physical assault.

Rape drugs render a woman unable to say no to or fight back against sexual assault or rape. Often the victim is paralyzed.

Abusing these drugs as a novelty can cause serious health problems and even death. They are even more dangerous if used with alcohol. In combination with each other and with alcohol (i.e.: Ketamine with one of the benzodiazepines plus alcohol) a likely result would be death.

What if I am at a bar and begin to think I have been drugged?

STOP DRINKING!
Get to a safe place. Phone for help immediately. If you see a person of trust like a manager, security guard, or public servant, ask for help. Ask a trusted friend to stay with you and assist you in getting the services you need: ambulance and police.

If your symptoms grow worse, your capacity will be reduced. Whomever you ask for help will likely need to act on your behalf in short order if you become completely incapacitated. Get medical care immediately. Call 911 or go to a hospital emergency department as soon as possible for an examination and evidence collection. Most “rape drugs” are metabolized very quickly by the body.  Benzodiazepines can have a quick effect (20 min.) and have a powerful effect (especially with alcohol)  initially and declining in effect in two to four hours. Everyone is different. Every drug is different. Much depends on dosage and what if any other drugs are in your system, including alcohol.

The sooner you receive medical care, the more likely it is to identify any substances used to drug you.

Ask the hospital or clinic where you receive medical care to take a urine sample for drug toxicology testing by your law enforcement agency’s crime lab. Drugs such as Rohypnol and GHB are more likely to be found in urine than in blood. Special tests must be conducted to detect these drugs. Most hospitals cannot conduct these tests at the levels necessary to completely assess if you were actually drugged.

If you think you may have been sexually assaulted, (you may not remember anything) you should have a specialized sexual assault examination (rape kit). (What to do if I have been raped.) Preserve all physical evidence of the assault. Do not shower, bathe, douche, eat, drink, wash your hands, or brush your teeth before you have a medical evaluation. Save the clothing you were wearing at the time of the assault. Do not disturb anything in the area where the assault occurred. Save any other materials that might contain evidence of the drug(s) you may have been given, such as the glass that held your drink.

If You are with Someone Who has been Rape Drugged, Get Them to a Hospital Fast

Call 911 WITHOUT HESITATION if you observe any of the following symptoms or any imminent danger.

  • Loses consciousness.
  • Has trouble breathing.
  • Has seizures.
  • Has signs of a heart attack, such as chest pain or chest pressure.
  • Has any troublesome physical or psychological reaction to apparent drug poisoning.

Call 911. Assist. Make sure the patient is breathing and that air passages are not blocked. If the patient’s breathing or heart ceases, perform resuscitation and CPR. Have someone call 911. Rape drugs and club drugs can kill. They can also cause permanent wide-ranging damage.

Get the patient into an ambulanceget them to a hospital immediately. In the hospital treatment for all patients with altered mental status begins with the basics of the ABCs: airway, breathing, and circulation. Ensure a patent airway with chin lift or jaw thrust and examine the mouth and pharynx for vomitus and foreign material. If appropriate, maintain proper spinal precautions during the evaluation or if there is a suspicion of trauma. Place the patient on cardiac and pulse oximetry monitors, provide supplemental oxygen, and obtain adequate intravenous access.

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RINJ: Fighting for the safety of women and children.